drieuxster (drieuxster) wrote,
drieuxster
drieuxster

The God Token Problem

Mad props to tongodeon for his best effort in In which I prove that God does not exist, but I am not sure this is what would pass as a proof, nor that it is addressing the relevant issue.

First off, God language is very real, and while it is memetic, and can be useful in explaining why there is a linguist implication towards a religious belief that numbers are numerical, this positive assertion does little if anything to deal with the existence or non-existence of numbers as actual entities.

Let Theta be a token that indicates the number of things is XplarG. Clearly if a XplarG exists, and it can contain things, then there exists some number which will be therein contained, and that number might as well be Theta as 'N' or 'K'.

So we can easily arrive at a utilizable notion, whether or not there is or is not an XplarG, and it can or can not contain things.

Now enter the anti-Thetans, who doubt that there ever was or ever will be Theta, irregardless of the state and containing capacity of XplarG. Not that i wish to be anti-thetical here or anything. But merely to show a part of the language game we are in the middle of.

The utility of god phrasing games (GPG) have always been independent of the god for whom the games were first played. This is easy to follow as we move Ishtar into Easter, and shaitan into satan. But do get to be problematic, as we saw the matter at law in the seventies, when the restoration of Mithra-ism inside of the american armed forces lead to the complications as to whether or not the american chaplaincy corp, and the uniform regulations, were under any obligation to maintain and support the classic religion of the roman legion. One of those niggly bits that of course most folks fail to discuss in polite society. I mean, if one were to abandon mithraism, would the american armed forces still be able to win wars, and protect americans from IranqIstanian Flying Saucers?

It is really not that hard to show that with the failure of the Roman Legion to maintain it's true moral piety, and fielty to one true religion, the empire crumbled under the myth of some dead jewish carpenter. Thus clearly disproving tongodeon central thesis. Not to mention helping folks understand that without the persecuted followers of Mithra inside the american armed forces, we would today be speaking russian under the jack booted iron fist of the Red Communist Anti-Christ in the white house.....

The alternative is that we step back form the 'he said, she said' approach as to which is the one true and only GOD! And work with the problems of GPG - and how as a species we keep blaming these classes of language games, rather than address the limitations of UTM's ( universal turing machines ) to provide a sufficiently robust enough computing language P, that given any input I, that they are able to provide computational entities Theta greater than their own complexity rating.

So why not blame Theta for the fall of the stock market instead of the myth that it is some how tied up with the fiasco in the greek debt refinancing problem - since, well, clearly in 'rational actor' model of market economics, such things should not happen! Thus again, we prove that the utility of a viable GPG will reveal the appropriate Theta, and thus, if we need to, that the president is the anti-christ, and that derivatives are, well, derived.

As long as there is a need for a god token in the GPG, there will be a god token in the GPG. It is not even a requirement that the god token actually exist. Since the existence or non-existence of the god token, is totally irrelevant to the GPG in itself! If we have learned anything from the last few thousand years of recorded history it is that the Croupier's crop will be in the hand with the better GPG.

Oh yes, never bet on a red God.
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